How to Tie a Tie: Lessons

How to Tie a Tie
Classic

Classic

It's Very Good

Instructions

Simple

Simple

Known as Four in Hand Is a Eastist

Instructions

Cavendish

Cavendish

The Cavendish knot combines the impressive size with the casual asymmetry because of its structure: the knot is actually a sequence of two Four-in-hand knots. You will get a narrow triangular knot that looks good on collars with wide collar opening. It works good on ties of light fabrics. The Cavendish knot was first described by two English physicists, the authors of the famous book "85 Ways To Tie A Tie", and named after Cavendish laboratories where they worked.

Instructions

Oriental

Oriental

The Oriental knot is the easiest way to tie a tie – it requires the least amount of moves possible. The knot is not widespread in western countries, but very popular among Chinese youth, and that’s where the name comes from. The Oriental knot belongs to the group of knots that start with placing the tie around the neck inside-out so the narrow end also appears to be back side up, when the knot is finished. Take into account that due to its simple structure the knot tends to work loose and will require adjustment during the day. The Oriental knot is small and asymmetrical which looks elegant on ties of heavy materials – knitted, woven or woolen – and on shirts with narrow collar opening. The knot is rather informal and suitable for casual parties.

Instructions

Pratt

Pratt

A medium-size symmetrical knot that belongs to the group of knots that start with placing the tie around the neck inside-out. That’s why the narrow end also appears to be backside up when the knot is finished. The Pratt knot looks better on wider ties of light and medium fabrics and is suitable for wide collar openings. You can wear the Pratt either on formal events or as your everyday business knot. It uses only a short length of the tie, so it is recommended for shorter ties or taller men. The knot was named after its inventor Jerry Pratt.

Instructions

Victoria

Victoria

This is an improved version of the Four-in-Hand knot with an additional turn of the wide end across the knot. This turn makes the Victoria knot longer and wider which is good for shirts with wide collars. Take into account that due to its simple structure the knot tends to work loose and will require adjustment during the day. The Victoria knot uses a bit more length of the tie than the Four-in-Hand, which can also be beneficial in case the tie is too long.

Instructions

Plattsburgh

Plattsburgh

The Plattsburgh knot has almost the same structure as the Windsor except for the position of the tie – it lies around the neck inside-out. The Plattsburgh is a large symmetrical knot of a regular conic shape: wide at the top and sharply narrowing down at the bottom. It works well on shirts with wide collar openings. With this knot you will looks serious and confident on any formal event. The Plattsburgh can give a second birth to the ties that are a bit worn out: thanks to its unusual way of tying it may hide the shabby parts. Thomas Fink, the inventor of the knot, named it after the small town of Plattsburgh where he was born.

Instructions

St. Andrew knot

St. Andrew knot

If you need a large formal knot and don’t want to deal with the Windsor, the St. Andrew knot is a good choice. It forms a wide elongated knot almost as large as the Windsor, but much easier to tie. Correctly tied and properly tightened, the knot protrudes over the collar in its bottom part which gives the tie an elegant curve. However, the knot is a bit asymmetric and not suitable for the most conservative events. It belongs to the group of knots that start with placing the tie around the neck inside-out, which also might be a disadvantage. St. Andrew looks better on ties of thick fabrics and on shirts with wide collar openings.

Instructions

Hanover

Hanover

The Hanover knot is the largest tie knot possible, even larger than the Windsor and easier to remember: just wrap the wide end around three different parts of the tie – the left part, the right part and then the hanging part. You will get a wide, symmetrical triangle. The Hanover knot works best on broad collars and will give you a festive and at the same time serious look. It may end up a bit bulky on knitted or woolen ties so it’s better to choose lighter materials. The Hanover knot uses a considerable length of the tie so it is a good choice for longer ties or shorter men. The Hanover belongs to the group of knots that start with placing the tie around the neck inside-out. It is named after the British royal house of Hanover, which reigned from 1760 to 1901.

Instructions

Kelvin

Kelvin

The Kelvin is an ideal knot for slim ties of heavy materials such as wool or cotton. This small and narrow knot is a bit bigger than the Four-in-Hand, but symmetric and very elegant. It has a regular trapezoid shape. The Kelvin knot belongs to the group of knots that start with placing the tie around the neck inside-out. It looks best on collars with narrow collar opening.

Instructions

Four in Hand

Four in Hand

This knot is the most widely used because it is very easy to tie and good for ties of all types. It makes a narrow, elongated knot, slightly asymmetric, which isn’t good for wide collar shirts. The knot is rather small on an ordinary silk tie. It looks best on tall men and men of medium height and is also recommended for men with shorter necks: thanks to its shape, the knot visually elongates the neck a bit. Due to its simplicity, the knot tends to work loose so it might require some adjustment during the day. There are several unconfirmed theories about the origin of the name. One of them suggests that drivers of four-in-hand carriages used to tie their ties this way.

Instructions

Windsor

Windsor

The Windsor is the most well-known tie knot for official occasions such as business meetings, job interviews, etc. It’s a large and symmetric knot that looks good on wide collar shirts. Keep in mind that due to its width, the Windsor visually shortens the neck a bit. The knot is rather complicated in structure and might turn out too large on thick ties, so it is recommended for lighter materials. The Duke of Windsor is commonly believed to be the inventor of the knot, but in fact it was invented by the public in an attempt to copy the large Four-in-hand knot on the Duke’s tie, which was made of especially thick materials.

Instructions

Half Windsor

Half Windsor

The Half-Windsor is a bit smaller than the normal Windsor and easier to do. It makes a slightly asymmetric triangular knot of medium size that is still suitable for formal events. The knot looks good on all types of collars including an open-collar and is ideal for wider ties of light and medium fabrics.

Instructions